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Research Roundup, August 27

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on August 27, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson npr

During the time schools in the Ferguson and Jennings districts in Missouri waited for the delayed start of school, teachers used the time to show their students and community that they care by helping with cleanups, meal delivers for students with needs, and mental health services.

Even Recess Offers a Kind of Education The Ridgefield Press

Elementary students in one Connecticut district are given both structured (physical education) and unstructured time (recess) during the school day so they can “experience and know what to do when they have that freedom.” Encouraging students to cooperate and demonstrate their leadership skills and enhance their soft skills through interaction with their fellow peers will be a lesson in itself.  Although the schools are in trial mode for this new method, implementing a new and different way to interact shows that school leaders are committed to more than just learning in the classroom.

A New Twist on Concentration: Standing While You Work District Administration

Schools are beginning to use standing desks in the classroom to fight the increasingly sedentary lifestyle that technology induces. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that more than a third of children were obese in 2012. A study in four Texas classrooms showed that students who used standing desks burned 300 more calories per week than students who sat at their desks. Teachers also said the “desks had a positive impact on student behavior and classroom performance.”

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Research Roundup, August 13

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on August 13, 2014

War Not Won, but Bullying, School Violence Have Declined Online Athens
The National Center for Education Statistics released numbers that indicate reported instances school violence has declined 74% over a course of 20 years, but educators and researchers acknowledge that the problem has not been resolved. A decline in bullying has also been evident, and schools and organizations are investigating to find out what more can be done to create a positive school climate.

White Students No Longer to Be Majority in School ABC News
Make more room for diversity—The National Center for Education Statistics releases more numbers for this fall: although white students are still the largest racial group, non-Hispanic white students make up 49.8% in U.S. public schools, while the total group of minority students become the majority. The reality of these demographics suggests the need to address “issues of immigration, poverty, diversity, and inequity.”

33 States Don't Protect LGBT Students in Anti-Bullying Laws Vox
Yes, it’s still legal for school personnel to discriminate against LGBT students in many states, and several of them do not include LGBT students in their anti-bullying policies. GLSEN illustrates these states through several maps of enumerated anti-bullying laws, nondiscrimination laws, and “no promo homo” laws. How implementing laws against discrimination can help students know they are protected, respected, and treated equally.

Special-Education Overhaul Leaves Students Less Violated, but Schools Struggle to Keep up Chalkbeat NY
Students with special needs in New York City are bussed to distant schools in order to receive the appropriate services, but the city is now facing the importance of inclusion for all students through new special-education policies. Although this is a step closer to inclusion, schools are having a difficult time putting these policies into practice. Schools need the support to make inclusion a reality in their buildings.

Tests That Look Like Video Games nprEd
How do you get students to be excited to take a test? Researchers measure the mind to see how students learn and “how they make decisions and how they respond to feedback” using web-based games.  In order to do well in the games—or tests—you need to learn something to move on to the next level.  The game will record the steps it took for the student to get to the right or wrong answer. Ultimately, Dan Schwartz, director of the AAA Lab at Stanford University, believes “the goal of education is to create independent thinkers who make good decisions… we need assessments that test how students think, not what they happen to know at a given moment.”
 

Enhancing SEL Learning at P169M

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on January 21, 2014

Our series of blog posts focused on social-emotional learning (SEL) continues. In this post, we introduce you to P169M, a District 75 school using SEL as a common language to enrich individual and group instruction needs.

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Promoting Social-Emotional Awareness at Mickey Mantle School

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on January 15, 2014

Developing a positive school climate is a partnership effort between the entire school community of educators, administrators, mental health professionals, students, and parents. Schools and districts across the nation are speaking to this effort in a number of innovate ways. In this post, we introduce you to Mickey Mantle School, a District 75 school developing a common language supportive of academic, social and emotional needs. Read on for the first of a series of blogs highlighting schools promoting high levels of social-emotional awareness and understanding.

By: Barry Daub, Principal, P811M-The Mickey Mantle School, New York, NY

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Research Roundup, December 17

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on December 17, 2013

Does Your School Climate Focus on Learning? Ed Week

As a school leader, I always believed that I was the biggest contributor to our school climate. It's not that I believe school leaders have the most important job in the school, because everyone plays an important part in the school community, but the climate of the school begins with the school leader.


Social Media: An Asset for Teachers and Leaders Ed Week

The use of social media as a communication tool for educators is inevitable. The paramount value of using social media is the creation and maintenance of relationships. It is a communication accelerant that moves information between people faster than we have ever experienced and, in fewer words than we are used to using.


11 Foreign Education Policies That Could Transform American Schools Huffington Post

We learned the results of the latest PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) last week, and American students performed the same on the well-regarded international exam as they have for the past ten years -- completely stagnant, smack dab in the middle of the spectrum...It could be time for our country to look at some of the specific protocols and methods that top-performing countries are using to educate their children. Here, we have highlighted 11 education policies from highly-ranked countries that seem to be working for them.


Ridgefield Park High School participates in innovative anti-bullying initiative NewJersey.com

Ridgefield Park Junior High School is participating in the ROOTS Program - a harassment, intimidation and bullying (HIB) prevention program in conjunction with Princeton University. The school's participation highlights its commitment to anti-bullying initiatives, and the program will yield tailor-made recommendations for further improving the social-emotional climate at RPJHS.


High quality PreK-8 education is critical News Herald

As we learn more about the brain and researchers gain a better understanding of how the body works, it appears that education does more than prepare kids for fulfilling careers.


This Research Roundup was compiled by Chanelle Spencer, Research Fellow at NSCC

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