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Research Roundup

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on November 14, 2014

School 'climate' affects teachers' expectations about students Z News 

The school environment in which teachers work affects their expectations about students, says a new study.The research conducted a multilevel analysis using data from 2,666 teachers in 71 secondary schools in Quebec. “From these data, the researchers could distinguish between two levels of variables -- the teacher: His/her perception of school climate, gender, age, courses taught; and the school: its academic, socio-economic, ethnic composition, and the way the entire school community perceived the school climate.”

 

Classroom Tech, Professional Development Top List of Faculty Concerns Campus Technology

This article discusses the changing role of social media in education.  “While technology is very helpful for student engagement and motivation, where it really shines is in providing professional development and opportunities for teachers to collaborate with colleagues. And social media is turning out to be a powerful tool for those purposes.” Sites proving to be most valuable are twitter, facebook, and google+ for conferences. 

 

Harding Elementary School teacher prepares students for high-tech future The Republic

A tech-savvy Ben Feight integrates technology into his 4th grade lessons. He says, “While assignments might feel more like entertainment, they align with Iowa Core 21st Century Skills like employability, financial, health, civic and technology literacy. He continues, "I want to make sure they are prepared for the world and show them the possibilities.”

 

BROADER MEASURES OF SUCCESS: SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL LEARNING York University

Broader Measures highlights the importance of teaching and measuring social emotional learning. The general positive outcomes include improved academic achievement, increased social-emotional skill, self-esteem and mental health. The report states, “The evidence is clear that it is very important to measure how students are progressing in the development of their core social/emotional competencies, and how classroom and school conditions are contributing to this vital aspect of their education. This is not just a vital aspect of their wellbeing, but a critical factor in their long-term academic attainment as well.”

Research Roundup, October 29

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 29, 2014

Prevention is Key to Stopping Bullying, Several Experts Say NewsOK

To change the prevalence of bullying in schools, prevention, not intervention, is more effective, research says. “The key to reducing bullying is instilling emotional intelligence in children early, as a preventative measure against becoming a bully or being victimized by one,” emphasizing that anti-bullying versus bullying prevention methods “tends to backfire.” This article highlights emotional intelligence as the “missing link” to prevent bullying.

The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence brookings.edu

The importance of non-cognitive skills to succeed in both school and in life is increasingly becoming a topic of interest in many intersecting realms. In this paper from the Center on Children and Families at Brookings, researchers emphasize the importance of character-skills in life outcomes and policy making. By distributing character strengths by socioeconomic backgrounds, measuring character strengths, and viewing the strengths from a “quality of opportunity perspective,” “The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence” breaks down the term “non-cognitive.”

The Economic Impact of School Suspensions The Atlantic

All girls are successful in schools. This is a misconception that vice president of education and employment at the National Women’s Law Center, Fatima Goss Graves, would like to clarify. “Much of this is fueled by not having data broken down by race and gender,” indicating that girls of color are then left out of the picture. The reasons behind the 34 percent of African American girls who did not graduate high school on time in 2010 as opposed to 18 percent of white female students “have less to do with student behavior…than with disproportionate and overly punitive disciplinary practices,” argues the authors of the recent report on “Unlocking Opportunity for African American Girls.”

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Research Roundup, October 22

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 22, 2014

Getting the Word Out, Part II: How Empowerment and Environment Transform School Climate ASCD

Everyone plays a part in school climate. In the first part of “Getting the Word Out,” equity and engagement were the key topics. In this piece, Sean Slade writes about empowerment and environment. What can educators do to empower students in the classroom? How can principals empower their staff and community? And what can school personnel do to help create a positive environment, both physically and the social-emotional? Read to find out different approaches to empowerment and environment, and the impact school climate contributes to the success of the school.

Things are Improving for LGBT Students, But They’re Still Really Bad Huffington Post

The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) released a survey on Wednesday that illustrated improvement for LGBT students in 2012-2013 compared to the 2010-2011 school year. The survey found that “of the nearly 8,000 students ages 13 to 21 who were surveyed, more than 55 percent reported feeling unsafe at school due to their sexual orientation, down from 64 percent in 2011.” A few of the contributions to this discrimination in schools? Certain school policies, hearing staff make homophobic remarks, and not enough staff intervention.

Small Schools Work in New York NY Times

Smaller, specialized high schools with roughly 100 students per grade and typically in black or Hispanic neighborhoods tend to have a more rigorous curriculum, personalized education, organized around a theme, and “valuable support from community partners.” While research shows that not all schools can or should be small schools, the research group MDRC has conducted a study that found “disadvantaged students who make up a vast majority of the small-school…are also more likely than those in the control group to enroll in college.”

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Advisory

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 16, 2014

Advisory should be a time when students and teachers have the opportunity to connect. How do we make this time meaningful so it really does contribute to schools being more positive and supportive? Whether you are fortunate to have an entire class period for advisory or feel you’re scrambling to set aside a decent amount of time to connect with students, we’ve gathered 3 topics that have been especially well-received in the field.

We hope these spark some interest and inspire you to try something new...

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Sara’s Story

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 15, 2014

Sara’s Story

13 year-old pop-opera singer Sara Stevensknows all too well what it feels like to be bullied for being “different”. Instead of being defeated by the teasing and harsh words she found solace and a new-found confidence through singing.

While she is only 13, some of Sara’s accomplishments include performing in La Boheme with the Atlanta Opera; singing the National anthem at the New York Giants vs. New England Patriots game; and gracing the legendary stage at Carnegie Hall. She's now working on her album with famed producer Paul Schwartzof Phantom of the Opera on Broadway.

This is her story:

 

My name is Sara Stevens. I'm 13 years old and I'm a singer. Have you ever been picked on, called a mean name or just simply left out and ignored? This is something kids deal with every day.

I understand. I was bullied too.

I was told that I was too tall, that I like to draw too much, and that I like to sing too much. Some kids even said I was fat. That hurt, but it never stopped me from being myself.

I remember one night I couldn't sleep and cried because I was so worried about going to school in the morning.

My mom taught me to be strong and I believe that tough times can make you stronger. When something is difficult, you can develop a confidence in yourself that you never knew you had.

My grandparents have also been very supportive of me following my dream, and they have done a lot to make it possible for me to do just that. My grandmother has told me many times to never try to be like anyone else, but to just be myself. My granddad reminds me to keep going when things don't go exactly the way I want. He tells me to keep working at what I am trying to accomplish.

There are other people who have been there for me. My vocal coach Amy Zorn has taught me so much about singing, and to never be afraid to show my feelings to the audience. And my producer Paul Schwartz, who is the first to congratulate me when a performance or recording has gone well, is also the first to remind me to continue working hard.

I also met a man named John Roberts. He's a music producer in Atlanta. Together, he and I wrote a song called Dance In This Dreamwhich was inspired by what I had gone through.

All these encouraging words from the people in my life make me feel good and happy. The best advice I can give to anyone out there struggling is believe in yourself never back down. Always stand up and know that your dream is waiting for you.   

I hope with all my heart that this song will touch many lives. It has a powerful message about looking for the positive and overcoming the negative. 

The most important thing a person can do is to be him or herself. Don't let anything hold you back, take your chance, find your dream and everything is possible! 

 

Listen to “Dance In This Dream” here.

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