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Research Roundup

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on December 16, 2014

Outlook on instruction: Class around the clock District Administration Magazine 

The idea that all students can learn the same material through the same old teaching methods is slowly changing.  Today, students are becoming more empowered to shape how they learn.  The availability of technology resources such as individual laptops for each student make this vision easier for educators who are now able to direct individual attention to students working on different assignments.  With these technology advances making the classroom environment accessible 24/7, collaboration and discussion between students and educators is thriving.

Big Drop In Students Being Held Back, But Why? NPR Blogs 

The decline in the number of students who are held back nationwide has declined with much mystery surrounding the reasons behind the decrease. Little attention to measuring grade retention has contributed to the lack of knowledge. Researchers have identified two reasons for the phenomenon: holding students back is costly and incentives for schools and districts to improve their graduation rates are too great to prevent advancement. On the upside, some educators indicate the progress is due to more students being identified earlier and having their needs met before the gaps in learning become too wide. 

The Race Gap in High School Honors Classes National Journal 

In fall 2013, students entering the University of California averaged over a 4.0 weighted high school GPA. A GPA above 4.0 is achieved by advanced placement classes. Unfortunately, not all students have access to these courses and minority students especially are more likely to attend high schools that do not offer these advanced classes compared to their white counterparts. Read on for highlights about the differences in advanced placement and college prep courses by ethnicity. 

5 Critical Questions for the Innovative Educator Connected Principals Blog 

New technologies are constantly being introduced to classrooms to enhance learning.  It is often difficult to keep up with the latest without disrupting the student classroom.  This article gives 5 tips on how educators can stay focused on what is most important in the classroom: the student.  

Research Roundup

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on December 12, 2014

Online Bullies Pull Schools Into the Fray NY Times

Cyberbullying seems to be growing at a faster rate than in the past.  Laws and case rulings have been contradictory leaving school principals unclear as to what authority they hold in regards to behavior outside of school. Because of the ambiguity in laws, a strong disconnect is present between school authority and student freedoms and rights.  It is unclear whether school administrators or parents should be educating and disciplining students.  Views from parents range from one extreme-schools getting involved and punishing “bullies”- to another extreme-allowing the matter to be handled by parents. These two conflicting views make it difficult for policies or programs to be developed.

 

FACT SHEET: Invest in US: The White House Summit on Early Childhood Education Whitehouse.gov

Obama is pushing for Education expansion; the sooner children are exposed to high-quality education, the better.  He urges high ranking officials and the public to come to a consensus and aide in the development of education policies to help children attain early access to preschool.  Obama hopes effective discussions between all stakeholders will result in a higher quality preschool.  Over $1 billion, along with federal awards, is being invested into action plans for young learners. Read more to find where the $1 billion investment is being allocated and for next steps that align with Obama’s vision for education.  

 

Connecting SEL and the Common Core, Part One Edutopia

Are young adults really ready for college? New college students may feel anxious about finding new friends, managing homework, choosing a major and knowing how to manage leisure versus study time. This blog digs deeper into student emotional well-being by defining what it means to be “college, career, and contribution ready” and how schools need to connect the lessons of core classes to student emotional well-being and self-esteem.  

Research Roundup Dec 1,2014

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on December 01, 2014

Bringing Education to African Girls   New York Times

Ms. Cotton was award the World Innovation Summit Education Prize for her role as founder of Camfed, an organization that has helped millions of young girls in sub-Saharan Africa. Through direct sponsorship to young women’s education, Camfed works to ensur girls remain in school. “Besides financially supporting students, the organization trains teachers, mentors and community activists. It has also created a 25,000-member network of Camfed graduates who use their own experiences to teach and advise their communities, something the organization calls a “virtuous cycle.”

 

What It Takes to Fix American Education The Daily Beast

“We’re spending way too much time focusing on who is ‘winning’ and ‘losing’ debates over education, and not enough on implementing proven solutions.” Jonah Edelman writes how education reform is not a quick fix, but a process that involves many long term changes. He believes students, teachers, and parents should all have a voice in the discussion. 

 

Sacramento City Schools Focus on Emotional Learning The Sacramento Bee

The school district of Sacramento is adding social learning to their curriculum for all grade levels. A teacher says, “The aim, is to move students toward responsible decision-making and making ethical and constructive choices about themselves and their social behavior.” Another questions, “It’s about what kind of future generation we are creating within our current set of students and what kind of world do we want to model for them? Social and emotional learning is at the heart of education. It has got to be. Otherwise we’re lost.”

 

IU Partnership Helps High School Students Learn Art of Film-making, Produce Movies The Republic

Susanne Schwibs, an experimental film professor at IU and Noel Koontz, a film literature teacher at academy decided to bring their classes together through service learning. “"When (IU students) learn and try to teach techniques to the high school students, they get a deeper understanding of what they themselves are doing," Schwibs said."Film-making is collaborative," Koontz said. He continues, "bringing the learners together helps to mimic the film-making process, and it gives his class a chance to try different kinds of techniques to create a narrative hands-on.”

 

Education policy lags behind research findings Boston Globe

There is new development in literature on how children develop skills that are crucial to academic and life-long success, and the development of the brain. The NIH study of a Chicago preschool program found that by age 24, children who participated in the program had lower rates of depression, violent crime and incarceration, and were more likely to attend four-year colleges and to have health insurance than children who did not participate in the preschool program. Learning requires that children be able to pay attention, be patient, persist, persevere, face their mistakes, and remain focused when frustrated. Each of these skills is rooted in the ability of children to understand, control and manage their own emotions.

Research Roundup

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on November 14, 2014

School 'climate' affects teachers' expectations about students Z News 

The school environment in which teachers work affects their expectations about students, says a new study.The research conducted a multilevel analysis using data from 2,666 teachers in 71 secondary schools in Quebec. “From these data, the researchers could distinguish between two levels of variables -- the teacher: His/her perception of school climate, gender, age, courses taught; and the school: its academic, socio-economic, ethnic composition, and the way the entire school community perceived the school climate.”

 

Classroom Tech, Professional Development Top List of Faculty Concerns Campus Technology

This article discusses the changing role of social media in education.  “While technology is very helpful for student engagement and motivation, where it really shines is in providing professional development and opportunities for teachers to collaborate with colleagues. And social media is turning out to be a powerful tool for those purposes.” Sites proving to be most valuable are twitter, facebook, and google+ for conferences. 

 

Harding Elementary School teacher prepares students for high-tech future The Republic

A tech-savvy Ben Feight integrates technology into his 4th grade lessons. He says, “While assignments might feel more like entertainment, they align with Iowa Core 21st Century Skills like employability, financial, health, civic and technology literacy. He continues, "I want to make sure they are prepared for the world and show them the possibilities.”

 

BROADER MEASURES OF SUCCESS: SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL LEARNING York University

Broader Measures highlights the importance of teaching and measuring social emotional learning. The general positive outcomes include improved academic achievement, increased social-emotional skill, self-esteem and mental health. The report states, “The evidence is clear that it is very important to measure how students are progressing in the development of their core social/emotional competencies, and how classroom and school conditions are contributing to this vital aspect of their education. This is not just a vital aspect of their wellbeing, but a critical factor in their long-term academic attainment as well.”

Research Roundup, October 29

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 29, 2014

Prevention is Key to Stopping Bullying, Several Experts Say NewsOK

To change the prevalence of bullying in schools, prevention, not intervention, is more effective, research says. “The key to reducing bullying is instilling emotional intelligence in children early, as a preventative measure against becoming a bully or being victimized by one,” emphasizing that anti-bullying versus bullying prevention methods “tends to backfire.” This article highlights emotional intelligence as the “missing link” to prevent bullying.

The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence brookings.edu

The importance of non-cognitive skills to succeed in both school and in life is increasingly becoming a topic of interest in many intersecting realms. In this paper from the Center on Children and Families at Brookings, researchers emphasize the importance of character-skills in life outcomes and policy making. By distributing character strengths by socioeconomic backgrounds, measuring character strengths, and viewing the strengths from a “quality of opportunity perspective,” “The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence” breaks down the term “non-cognitive.”

The Economic Impact of School Suspensions The Atlantic

All girls are successful in schools. This is a misconception that vice president of education and employment at the National Women’s Law Center, Fatima Goss Graves, would like to clarify. “Much of this is fueled by not having data broken down by race and gender,” indicating that girls of color are then left out of the picture. The reasons behind the 34 percent of African American girls who did not graduate high school on time in 2010 as opposed to 18 percent of white female students “have less to do with student behavior…than with disproportionate and overly punitive disciplinary practices,” argues the authors of the recent report on “Unlocking Opportunity for African American Girls.”

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