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Research Roundup, October 22

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 22, 2014

Getting the Word Out, Part II: How Empowerment and Environment Transform School Climate ASCD

Everyone plays a part in school climate. In the first part of “Getting the Word Out,” equity and engagement were the key topics. In this piece, Sean Slade writes about empowerment and environment. What can educators do to empower students in the classroom? How can principals empower their staff and community? And what can school personnel do to help create a positive environment, both physically and the social-emotional? Read to find out different approaches to empowerment and environment, and the impact school climate contributes to the success of the school.

Things are Improving for LGBT Students, But They’re Still Really Bad Huffington Post

The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) released a survey on Wednesday that illustrated improvement for LGBT students in 2012-2013 compared to the 2010-2011 school year. The survey found that “of the nearly 8,000 students ages 13 to 21 who were surveyed, more than 55 percent reported feeling unsafe at school due to their sexual orientation, down from 64 percent in 2011.” A few of the contributions to this discrimination in schools? Certain school policies, hearing staff make homophobic remarks, and not enough staff intervention.

Small Schools Work in New York NY Times

Smaller, specialized high schools with roughly 100 students per grade and typically in black or Hispanic neighborhoods tend to have a more rigorous curriculum, personalized education, organized around a theme, and “valuable support from community partners.” While research shows that not all schools can or should be small schools, the research group MDRC has conducted a study that found “disadvantaged students who make up a vast majority of the small-school…are also more likely than those in the control group to enroll in college.”

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Research Roundup, October 8

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 08, 2014

State Introduces Tools for School Change EdSource

The California Department of Education has released a new resource site called Quality Schooling Framework that will “guide administrators through the process of identifying priorities, gathering data, building support and implementing and assessing new programs,” with an emphasis on “school culture and climate.” This framework is set to help reach school improvement goals within the budgetary and state limits, while taking action on districts’ priorities. However, questions remain unanswered regarding how this framework will be executed within districts.

Invalidation During The Teenage Years Increases The Risk Of Self-Harm In Young People Science World Report

In a study conducted among 99 hospitalized teens, researchers found that there was a high perception of the lack of acceptance from either family or peers. These 99 teens were hospitalized “out of concern about suicide risk,” ranging from cases regarding bullying to family invalidation. Boys particularly had a “statistically significant predictor of a later suicide event,” and both boys and girls had “strong indicators” of self-harm.

Helping Students Find Purpose and Appreciation for School Edutopia

How can educators take mindful steps to recharge, appreciate, take ownership, and find purpose in their role as leaders in the school? This blog post by Maurice Elias explains that changes one step at a time can make a big difference in satisfaction and productivity, and how you can start integrating the needs of educators with the needs of students.

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School Climate Transformation

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on September 15, 2014

Integrating behavioral models with a holistic approach that supports students, parents and school personnel learning and working together

by Jonathan Cohen, President & Co-founder of NSCC

Too many educational leaders are confused about what school climate improvement means: a behaviorally informed model or a more holistic and comprehensive effort that intentionally engages students, parents or guardians, school personnel and even community members to learn and work together.

There is growing awareness that K-12 schools are struggling with two major problems that undermine student learning and their healthy development: bully-victim-bystander behavior and the shameful high school dropout rates that disproportionally effect economically disadvantaged students of color and feed the high school to prison pipeline.

A growing number of Federal organizations, State DOE’s and districts as well as the recent School Discipline Consensus Project report and AERA’s Bully Prevention Report and Recommendations have recognized and endorsed school climate improvement efforts as an evidence-based strategy that promotes school connectedness, reduces bully-victim-bystander behavior as well as student drop out rates.

The US Department of Education (ED) has decided to do something about it by soliciting the School Climate Transformation grants and allocating $29 million to deal with these problems.

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Research Roundup, August 13

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on August 13, 2014

War Not Won, but Bullying, School Violence Have Declined Online Athens
The National Center for Education Statistics released numbers that indicate reported instances school violence has declined 74% over a course of 20 years, but educators and researchers acknowledge that the problem has not been resolved. A decline in bullying has also been evident, and schools and organizations are investigating to find out what more can be done to create a positive school climate.

White Students No Longer to Be Majority in School ABC News
Make more room for diversity—The National Center for Education Statistics releases more numbers for this fall: although white students are still the largest racial group, non-Hispanic white students make up 49.8% in U.S. public schools, while the total group of minority students become the majority. The reality of these demographics suggests the need to address “issues of immigration, poverty, diversity, and inequity.”

33 States Don't Protect LGBT Students in Anti-Bullying Laws Vox
Yes, it’s still legal for school personnel to discriminate against LGBT students in many states, and several of them do not include LGBT students in their anti-bullying policies. GLSEN illustrates these states through several maps of enumerated anti-bullying laws, nondiscrimination laws, and “no promo homo” laws. How implementing laws against discrimination can help students know they are protected, respected, and treated equally.

Special-Education Overhaul Leaves Students Less Violated, but Schools Struggle to Keep up Chalkbeat NY
Students with special needs in New York City are bussed to distant schools in order to receive the appropriate services, but the city is now facing the importance of inclusion for all students through new special-education policies. Although this is a step closer to inclusion, schools are having a difficult time putting these policies into practice. Schools need the support to make inclusion a reality in their buildings.

Tests That Look Like Video Games nprEd
How do you get students to be excited to take a test? Researchers measure the mind to see how students learn and “how they make decisions and how they respond to feedback” using web-based games.  In order to do well in the games—or tests—you need to learn something to move on to the next level.  The game will record the steps it took for the student to get to the right or wrong answer. Ultimately, Dan Schwartz, director of the AAA Lab at Stanford University, believes “the goal of education is to create independent thinkers who make good decisions… we need assessments that test how students think, not what they happen to know at a given moment.”
 

Research Roundup, July 7

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on July 07, 2014

To help or not to help: The homework question Deseret News: National Edition

Traditionally, part of good parenting is helping your kids with their homework, but new research says that might be detrimental to your child's academic performance.


When the Teacher Is Depressed NY Times

In a study published last month in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, [Lieny] Jeon and her co-authors found that behavioral problems were more common among 3-year-olds whose teachers reported depressed mood than among preschoolers whose teachers were not depressed. Such behavioral problems include inattentiveness, aggressiveness, emotional reactivity and anxious or depressive symptoms. The authors of the study suggest a couple of possible explanations for the link between teachers’ depression and children’s behavior problems.


Ethical Considerations In A Three-tiered Approach To School Discipline Policy And Practice Psychology in the Schools

Research indicates that school discipline policies and practices have a significant influence on both student and school functioning. The purpose of this article is to uncover how the ethical standards guiding the field of school psychology inform school decisions about discipline in a three-tiered approach. Various discipline approaches, empirical research evaluating the effectiveness of these approaches, and the role of school psychologists in school discipline decision making are reviewed. Ultimately, this integration of theory, empirical research, and ethical standards points to the importance of creating comprehensive and individualized school discipline policies that apply ethically sound practices at all three tiers of intervention. Implications for practicing school psychologists are discussed.


Mayworm, A. M. and Sharkey, J. D. (2014), ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN A THREE-TIERED APPROACH TO SCHOOL DISCIPLINE POLICY AND PRACTICE. Psychol. Schs.. doi: 10.1002/pits.21782


Ed school to share in $5 million grant Evanston Now

Northwestern and two other schools will share a nearly $5 million grant to create a new national center to study how educational leaders -- including school district supervisors and principals -- use research when making decisions.


This Research Roundup was compiled by Chanelle Spencer, Research Fellow at NSCC

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