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Research Roundup, October 15

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 15, 2014

Two New Reports Argue for In-School Mental Health Screenings Time

New reports (which is “UK specific but also looks at U.S. programming”) published in The Lancet Psychiatry show that “75% of adults who access mental health treatment had a diagnosable disorder when they were under age 18, but in high-income countries, only 25% of kids with mental health problems get treated.” The reports suggest schools to add mental health care into their services as a method to identify and treat at-risk children, particularly if there are visible signs such as weight fluctuation or bullying.  While only some schools in the U.S. and internationally have mental health programs, it is not a standard for schools to implement.

With Black Students, Some Schools Are More Ready to Punish Than Help The New York Times

This is a New York Times blog post written by Piazadora Footman, mother of 9 year old Xavier, who feels that her son has been experiencing racial inequities in school after reading a report from the DOE Office of Civil Rights. When Xavier, who has an IEP, had behavioral issues, he was sent to the principal’s office and at times, even suspended. “It seemed as if they saw him as a bad child, not a child with needs the school could help to address,” said Footman. Finally, Footman moved her son to a new school that had resources and the right kind of support for students. Xavier is improving in his school work and no longer has outbursts. “Children need to be taught with love and understanding.”

Q&A with Daniel Goleman: How the Research Supports Social-Emotional Learning Edutopia

In a Q&A session with Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence: Why it Matters More Than IQ and The Triple Focus: A New Approach to Education, Edutopia explores the relationship between social-emotional learning and academic achievement, the controversy over “grit,” and how SEL in schools can help behavior in the classroom and the home. Goleman explains using data from a recent “meta-analysis of different studies analyzing schools that have SEL programs and those that don’t.” Check out this brief interview to read Goleman’s thoughts.

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Research Roundup, October 8

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on October 08, 2014

State Introduces Tools for School Change EdSource

The California Department of Education has released a new resource site called Quality Schooling Framework that will “guide administrators through the process of identifying priorities, gathering data, building support and implementing and assessing new programs,” with an emphasis on “school culture and climate.” This framework is set to help reach school improvement goals within the budgetary and state limits, while taking action on districts’ priorities. However, questions remain unanswered regarding how this framework will be executed within districts.

Invalidation During The Teenage Years Increases The Risk Of Self-Harm In Young People Science World Report

In a study conducted among 99 hospitalized teens, researchers found that there was a high perception of the lack of acceptance from either family or peers. These 99 teens were hospitalized “out of concern about suicide risk,” ranging from cases regarding bullying to family invalidation. Boys particularly had a “statistically significant predictor of a later suicide event,” and both boys and girls had “strong indicators” of self-harm.

Helping Students Find Purpose and Appreciation for School Edutopia

How can educators take mindful steps to recharge, appreciate, take ownership, and find purpose in their role as leaders in the school? This blog post by Maurice Elias explains that changes one step at a time can make a big difference in satisfaction and productivity, and how you can start integrating the needs of educators with the needs of students.

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Research Roundup, September 10

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on September 10, 2014

Why Learning Space Matters Edutopia

Think about your classroom when you were in school. You know what you liked and what you didn’t like—so how can we change our classrooms today? The physical surroundings, including comfort, lighting, and visual displays all affect the way young students feel and learn. Edutopia makes suggestions on how to affordably alter your classroom in a “neuroscience-compatible” way.

Teaching Children Empathy NY Times

Harvard University’s Making Caring Common project recently released a report on the values that adults send to children, lacking value in empathy. “Empathy... is a function of both compassion and of seeing from another person’s perspective, and is the key to preventing bullying and other forms of cruelty.” This piece dives into 5 suggestions that Harvard project believes will develop empathy in children.

With new school year, new rules for parent engagement have begun Chalkbeat New York

NYC’s Chancellor Carmen Farina and teachers’ union President Michael Mulgrew discuss how to use the new contract for parent outreach effectively. With the new mandate, the Chancellor hopes to see improved schools as “communication about academics and social-emotional development” become more prevalent. Teachers must use 40 minutes of their time after school on Tuesdays for parent engagement activities, and “80 minutes on Mondays to be spent on in-school teacher training.”

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Research Roundup, September 3

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on September 03, 2014

Download the Parent Toolkit App NBC News- Education Nation

If you’re familiar with the Parent Toolkit website, the Parent Toolkit app will make access much simpler. From customization to creating a list to review later, the freshly released app will help parents benchmark their children’s learning and development and how you can support them in the process. Available on both Android and iOS, now you can use the Toolkit anywhere you go. Brand new sections on Social & Emotional Development will be available in October on the website, so stay tuned!

Kids and Screen Time: What Does The Research Say? npr

Could your child or student be missing out on human emotion recognition? A study conducted by UCLA shows that increased time spent on technology can inhibit the ability to read emotions. One group of sixth grade students were sent to an education camp for five days without access to electronic devices, while another group spent their lives as usual.  After the end of the five days, students who went to camp “scored significantly higher when it came to reading facial emotions or other nonverbal cues than the students who continued to have access to their media devices.” With the evolving classroom incorporating more screen time for students, how will this affect their learning?

How to Get Kids to Class NY Times

Students that come from lower income backgrounds often struggle keeping a perfect attendance in school. Research shows that “chronically absent students have lower G.P.A.s, lower test scores and lower graduation rates than their peers who attend class regularly.” This opinion piece by president of Communities in Schools Daniel Cardinali says bringing in social services may be the answer to help these students with the extra support they lack.

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Research Roundup, August 27

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on August 27, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson npr

During the time schools in the Ferguson and Jennings districts in Missouri waited for the delayed start of school, teachers used the time to show their students and community that they care by helping with cleanups, meal delivers for students with needs, and mental health services.

Even Recess Offers a Kind of Education The Ridgefield Press

Elementary students in one Connecticut district are given both structured (physical education) and unstructured time (recess) during the school day so they can “experience and know what to do when they have that freedom.” Encouraging students to cooperate and demonstrate their leadership skills and enhance their soft skills through interaction with their fellow peers will be a lesson in itself.  Although the schools are in trial mode for this new method, implementing a new and different way to interact shows that school leaders are committed to more than just learning in the classroom.

A New Twist on Concentration: Standing While You Work District Administration

Schools are beginning to use standing desks in the classroom to fight the increasingly sedentary lifestyle that technology induces. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that more than a third of children were obese in 2012. A study in four Texas classrooms showed that students who used standing desks burned 300 more calories per week than students who sat at their desks. Teachers also said the “desks had a positive impact on student behavior and classroom performance.”

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